Concussions/TBI, a Q&A with Adam Todd, MD

Dr Todd earned his medical degree from the University of Minnesota.  He comopleted his neurology residency and an additional year of fellowship traning in clinical neurophysiology(EMG and EEG) at the University of Minnesota.

Dr  AdamTodd earned his medical degree from the University of Minnesota. He completed his neurology residency and an additional year of fellowship traning in clinical neurophysiology (EMG and EEG) at the University of Minnesota.

 

How do you know you have had concussion/Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

Concussion/TBI can occur with a blow to the head or body or any instance in which a force is transmitted to the head. Symptoms typically develop within minutes and include a vacant stare, slow response to questions or instructions, trouble with attention, disorientation, dizziness, memory loss and irritability. The most obvious symptom is loss of consciousness, but this is not a requirement to be diagnosed with a concussion/TBI.

How long do the symptoms last?

Most people recover within a week to 1 month depending on the severity of their injury. In a small minority of patients, symptoms can persist up to a year or more.

What are the benefits of seeing a neurologist for concussion/TBI?

If post-concussive symptoms are severe or persist, this may indicate a more significant injury such as bleeding on the brain. This requires prompt attention and evaluation with appropriate neuroimaging of the brain. In addition, studies have shown that seeing a physician following concussion/TBI can lessen the severity and number of post-concussive symptoms.

Thank you Dr. Todd for providing us with some great information!

To learn more about Dr. Adam Todd and how he works with his patients, visit his video bio at: http://www.noranclinic.com/providers/todd_adam.html

If you have additional questions about concussion or traumatic brain injuries and would like to schedule an appointment with a neurologist, please contact Noran Neurological Clinic at 612-879-1500.

 

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